Is it God’s Will to Heal Everyone? A Problem with the Question

Is it God’s Will to Heal Everyone? A Problem with the Question

This question, common as it is, has a serious problem. Continue reading “Is it God’s Will to Heal Everyone? A Problem with the Question”

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2 Hermeneutical Errors of the Prosperity Gospel

2 Hermeneutical Errors of the Prosperity Gospel

The prosperity “gospel” is perhaps the largest heresy of the church today. It is ubiquitous in, and growing on, every continent. There has been much written about the errors of the prosperity “gospel”, for they are legion. A whole volume could be filled with examples of how they rip Scripture out of context, downplay the promise of suffering in the New Testament, absolutize one Scripture at the expense of others, read physical prosperity into texts where it has no place, elevate the gift above the giver, distort the warnings about wealth etc. However, beneath all this there are two fundamental hermeneutical problems that I have encountered again and again in its adherents. They are a backwards reading of redemptive history and an over-realized eschatology. Continue reading “2 Hermeneutical Errors of the Prosperity Gospel”

When did the New Testament become Canon?

Last week I wrote an article on pseudepigraphy in the New Testament canon. This article is the companion piece to that and is written by Gregory Dean Kabakjian. Greg has a B.A. in Biblical Studies from Messiah College and is pursuing a MAR from Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. Continue reading “When did the New Testament become Canon?”

What’s Wrong with the Problem of Evil?

What’s Wrong with the Problem of Evil?

In his essay, “Evil and Omnipotence,” atheist philosopher J. L. Mackie argues that the Christian belief in a wholly good, omnipotent God is incompatible with the existence of evil. Mackie’s argument takes the following form:

P1:  God is wholly good.

P2: God is omnipotent.

P3: Evil exists.

P4: Good is opposed to evil in such a way that it always eliminates it as far as it can.

P5: There are no limits to what an omnipotent thing can do.

C: The existence of a being who is both good and omnipotent and the existence of evil are incompatible. Continue reading “What’s Wrong with the Problem of Evil?”

Who Wrote the New Testament?

Who Wrote the New Testament?

Many scholars adopt the view that many of the NT books are pseudepigraphal for a variety of reasons. Their reasons can be summed up under two broad categories: style and content. These are not hermetically sealed categories and inform one another, e.g. the style of an author will reflect the type of content he is writing (exhortation, warning, doxology, etc.). Scholars use these two categories to argue that certain books could not have been written in the lifetime of the claimed author but must have been written later.

Continue reading “Who Wrote the New Testament?”

Reformation 500: Sola Fide, The Apostle Paul and Romans 3

(This article was originally published here)

I hope that the previous articles (here and here)have been able to show beyond any doubt, what these councils, catechisms, and confessions teach concerning justification and the many differences between the Roman Catholic and the Historic Protestant views. We now turn to what the Apostle Paul has to say on the matter. I will defend these two things: 1) that Paul teaches justification by faith alone apart from works, and 2) that Paul teaches that in justification Christ’s righteousness is imputed to us. In order to do this I will deal with three texts, Romans 3:19-4:12, Romans 5:15-19, and 2 Corinthians 5:17-21[1]. Continue reading “Reformation 500: Sola Fide, The Apostle Paul and Romans 3”

Reformation 500: Sola Fide and The Historic Protestant View

(This article was originally published here)

In the past article we laid out the Roman Catholic doctrine of justification. Now we turn to discuss the Protestant view of justification. One can find a brief definition of justification in the Westminster Shorter Catechism’s answer to question 33, “Justification is an act of God’s free grace, wherein he pardoneth all our sins, and accepteth us as righteous in His sight, only for the righteousness of Christ imputed to us, and received by faith alone.”[1] Continue reading “Reformation 500: Sola Fide and The Historic Protestant View”